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drones gaga

Lady Gaga recently performed a 15-minute death-defying SuperBowl halftime show that skyrocketed her music sales by 1000%. To most people, that’s impressive. But to some (like me), what’s equally impressive is the flock of “stars” which are drones with LED lights attached forming an impressive backdrop of moving stars and an American flag, as Gaga sings the patriotic opening tune “God Bless America”.

It was only moments after the performance that it was revealed that the drones spectacular was indeed pre-filmed before the actual halftime show, due to restrictions over the use of Unmanned Ariel Vehicles, or UAVs.

The use of drones has long sparked interests in various stakeholders. They have been used in warfare, filmmaking, delivery and even firefighting. Interest in the consumer usage of drones has skyrocketed over the past few years, and commercially drones are being explored for many industrial, agricultural and – most recently – entertainment purposes.

In Southeast Asia, drones have been moving away from military technologies to more industry verticals and applications. Asia is seeing a “proliferation of companies coming out thinking creatively and informatively about how drone technology can be developed,” according to a spokesman for SZ DJI Technology Co., world’s top consumer drone maker by revenue.

One industry application that drones can be very useful for in Southeast Asia is agriculture. Making up a big part of the economy in Southeast Asia, agriculture however is still mostly done manually due to the lack of capital investments into new technologies done. Farming is still mostly done in small family scale, and lack of awareness of new technologies further distance farmers from gaining the capability to transform traditional farming.

Drones can produce precise 3D maps for early soil analysis, plant seeds automatically reducing the amount of time and manpower needed, spraying more efficiently to reduce amount of chemicals penetrating into groundwater, monitor crops over a large area at real time, provide weather-dependent irrigation and assess crop health remotely. All of these possibilities can be achieved from the comfort of a control centre and may even be done automatically, for example in the case of Cau Dat Farm in Da Lat, Vietnam, which has developed various IoT technologies for their own farms in the area to produce fresh, healthy and farm-to-table agricultural produce.

The usage of drones is still very contentious in the region. Many countries in the region are still working on imposing certain restrictions and regulations on how to use drones commercially and personally. Nevertheless, just like any other new technologies, under proper regulations and management, drones have the potential to amaze – on and off stage.

Let me know your thoughts. If you have any inquiry on next-generation technologies and their use in Southeast Asia, reach out at dinh@industry-platform.com!

by Nguyen Dinh Viet Anh

Without any surprise, Indonesia is considered to be one of the most prospective markets in Southeast Asia for enterprise Internet of Things (IoT) adoption. Gartner predicted that by 2018, Indonesia, together with other Southeast Asia countries, will have spent a total of $62 billion for technology.

Taking a closer look at the market, there are two upcoming sectors looking to tackle their problems and improve their business performance with the use of IoT technologies. These sectors are agriculture and property.

Agriculture

In the coming decade, farming industry will become more significant than ever. UN Food and Agriculture Organization forecast that the world needs to increase its food production by 70% in 2050 compared to 2006. As a key sector of Indonesian economy, will Indonesian agriculture be able to fulfill the growing needs?

According to World Bank, Indonesian agriculture comprises of 13.3% of the total GDP in 2014. Despite being a large contributor of Indonesian economy, the agriculture does not have the capacity to catch up to the escalated demand for food with its current farming performance. Take an example of cocoa farming. International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) foresee that demand for cocoa will exceed the supply by 2020. Being 3rd largest cocoa producer in the world, unfortunately, does not guarantee that Indonesia will reap all the benefits. The reason is that, as mentioned by Marc Donaldson, senior partner at On The Ball Consulting, limited sustainable network in Asia hampers its ability to fulfill future cocoa demand. However, the most important factor is due to the unpredictable climate change, causing inefficient production.

Indonesian farmers understand that they need to improve efficiency. Turning traditional agriculture into smart agriculture with IoT is definitely key to their survival in the industry. With application of technologies in the field, such as sensors and drones, not only will they be able to access climate forecasts but also to collect crop data. A number of studies on average farm done by OnFarm (connected farm IoT platform developer) showed the success of IoT in agriculture with revenue grew by 1.75%, energy cost fell by 35% to $13/acre, and use of water for irrigation dropped by 8%.

 

Property

The use of IoT in property development sector has become more prevalent. Gartner predict that smart homes (a home equipped with lighting, heating, and electronic devices that can be controlled remotely by smartphone or computer) will use over 1 billion connected things in 2018. The reason for the rise of smart home is the greater value property developers can gain in terms of revenue. But how does that work?

IoT technologies allow developers to boost their competitive position in real estate market by going an extra mile to enhance resident living experience. According to Intel, houses with IoT guarantee a safer and more comfortable environment as well as lower energy consumption. It is proven by the survey conducted in the United States by Coldwell Banker Real Estate and CNET (consumer technology news and reviews website) which discovered 45% of smart home product users claim that these products helped them save $1,100 per year and 87% agree that their lives have been easier with everything controlled through their smartphone.

Understanding these benefits, several Indonesian developers have realized the importance of integrating technology to everyday life. With the aim to increase its market share, Indonesia’s biggest property developer, Agung Podomoro Land (APLN), has planned to equip smart home technology products for its residential properties in more than five estates. Homeowners may enjoy the connectivity of all devices at home from microwave to washing machine in just one click away.

To sum up, even though Indonesia is still a developing country, we believe that there is a potential to venture into the market. Both agriculture and property are upcoming sectors looking forward to improving their businesses with IoT.

Find out more about how IoT is impacting Indonesian enterprises at Asia IoT Business Platform Indonesia 2017, 7- 8 August, Jakarta.

As we launch first ever IoT-focused conference in Vietnam, here are some of the conversation snippets we had with the local telcos on the current IoT development:

What is the current state of IoT development in the Vietnam? 

In Vietnam itself, IoT development is still at the initial stage: service providers are learning and importing solutions from abroad to apply in Vietnam.

“It’s like a 4-5 year old child and has ample opportunities for interested stakeholders to join now. If you join later, the child will grown up and you can not catch him,” said Alex Nguyen, Vice Director of Viettel IoT Center.

Which industries are leading the uptake of IoT locally?

From a bigger picture, public sector seems to be a huge focus for local telcos. Industries that have been allocated huge amount of budget from the government include vehicle tracking, smart electric grid, smart water and smart city.

“Wireless data fee is relatively cheap, and it gives opportunities for IoT applications such as connected car and taxi, railway or transportation services,” said Alex.

VNPT is working on Smart City Plans for cities which, including Smart Lighting, Smart Grid, Smart Parking, Smart Home, Smart Office, etc.

According to Vũ Ngọc Quý from the market research and product development team in VNPT VinaPhone, logistic companies within Vietnam can largely benefit from tracking devices such as VNPT Tracking.

“Recently, Smart-home become well populated in Vietnam. We’re seeing more companies with solutions like security, alarm system, camera, air monitoring, smart controllers, etc. Smart-home with plug and play function as well as preinstall flat brings a lot of potential to the property business,” said Quý.

Alex added that Vietnam has a lot of agriculture areas, and smart farming is an important industry with currently change in the environment change.

Where do the most opportunities for CSPs lie in Vietnam?

According to Quý, the most opportunities for CSPs lie within the public and business sectors.

“In which, the customer does not pay directly to us. However, they pay for extra services of their other providers. For example, customer buy insurance for their car, within the insurance contract the customer received the package including the VNPT Tracking which they can know the location of their cars or the health check via M2M installed in their car (by VNPT VinaPhone) reported to them.”

To Viettel, CSP is the central of all connections and they strongly encourage new connections to be developed in Vietnam. “We don’t have enough capability to expand IoT every single industry, so we are planning to develop IoT platform to support IoT developers with connectivity and software development,” said Alex.

Alex attended the 9th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform in Jakarta last month, and saw opportunities to develop new network with a cheaper price and lower energy for IoT such as SigFox and LoRa.

Advice for solution providers that are looking to venture into Vietnam?

Quý: It is the best to work together with operators like us since we have large customer based and also understand the market. The combined package of various services is easier to sell than single solution since customers want convenience.

Alex: Don’t be late, join us now and work together to make your solutions happen here in Vietnam.

Co-hosted with local governments and telecommunication companies, Asia IoT Business Platform is the largest ASEAN gathering to educate public sectors and end users across verticals on adoption of IoT and M2M technologies. The 11th edition will be held in Hanoi, Vietnam on 29-30 November 2016.

Leave us a comment if you would like to be included in the latest updates of IoT in ASEAN.

hanoi-logo

We recently concluded our 11th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform two weeks ago in Hanoi, Vietnam. While it was also our last programme for 2016, it was our first programme in Vietnam to explore the country’s IoT market. Over two days, we saw different IoT stakeholders ranging from government bodies, telecommunications companies, IoT solutions providers, and enterprises convening and engaging in vibrant and interesting discussions on all things IoT.

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It was amazing to witness the excitement and enthusiasm of our participants toward the prospect of emerging sophisticated technologies that can potentially transform business processes, operations, and systems. Considering that Vietnam is still in the nascent stage of developing their IoT infrastructure and capabilities, the level of interest in the market is impeccable.

Having said that, there are some case studies and presentations that caught our attention; mainly because some enterprises and verticals are already deep into the IoT game! Here are our three interesting takeaways from our programme in Hanoi:

  1. Cau Dat Farm and their IoT aspiration

 

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Tung Pham, Director at Cau Dat Farm presenting on the application of IoT in agriculture and the difficulties and challenges of deployment

Cau Dat Farm—initially a tea factory built by the French in 1927—is one of the first movers to leverage IoT to tackle their supply side. Cau Dat Farm’s current IoT solutions deploy a gateway to collect data from farm through a system of sensors, weather stations and robots, so farm operations can be managed via the cloud. The farm is now looking to build a substantial database for agriculture to solve the questions of forecasting crops, diseases, and productivity. However, they do not have the capabilities to achieve that and they are looking for partners and solutions providers to take their IoT project to the next level.

  1. The Smart Cities Race in Vietnam

 

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Smart Cities Panel comprising leaders from Da Nang (Tran Ngoc Thach), Ha Noi (Nguyen Xuan Quang), Ho Chi Minh City (Vo Minh Thanh), and Virtual Access – N’osairis (Patrick Conway). The panel was moderated by Dr. Mai Liem Truc, Former Deputy Minister, Ministry of Post and Telecommunications

One of the panels at our programme in Hanoi was dedicated to the discussion on Smart Cities. Through the panel, we realised that cities in Vietnam are making great progress in their respective Smart City initiatives. Da Nang, for instance, have already rolled out their e-Government platform which is able to connect everyone—from public servants and leaders to citizens—on a single application. The city is now looking to develop and catalyse the progress on their IT infrastructure, manpower, communications, and other applications. To achieve this, investments and partners are critical.

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                                                                            Questions from the audience

  1. Vinamilk’s Mega (Smart) Factory

 

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Nguyen Quoc Khanh, Executive Director R&D at Vinamilk, presenting a case study on Vinamilk’s Mega (Smart) Factory

Vinamilk is the largest dairy company in Vietnam and it is also one of the enterprises in the country to have deployed IoT to streamline its manufacturing operations and improve efficiency. Vinamilk has a factory with the highest technology automation, connecting all processes within the factory via system from input to output. Its smart warehouse is operated by automatic transport and management system, complemented by an extensive Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system. This underscores the efficacy of certain enterprises in adopting and deploying IoT, which poses much opportunity for solutions providers to seize.

There were many other presentations and case studies shared in Hanoi which are interesting and valuable for IoT stakeholders. From the instances above and from the other case studies shared in Hanoi, we are confident that Vietnam will continue to grow and develop and provide many opportunities for solutions providers targeting enterprise adoption of IoT. While IoT stakeholders also believe that the potential of IoT in Vietnam is undoubtable, it is critical to have more supportive policies from the government. We hope that our programme in Vietnam managed to communicate the importance of seizing the IoT opportunities in an emerging market and that when we return to Vietnam next November, more developments are in place and IT companies will realise the value in these emerging markets.

If you’re interested in exploring the ASEAN enterprise IoT market, we will be holding an exclusive programme in Singapore in February 2017. It will feature the most relevant IoT case studies and panel discussions across the different markets in the region. The programme is the launch event for our 2017 series in Myanmar, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam. Feel free to contact me at zaidani@industry-platform.com for more information.

by Abdullah Zaidani

IoT Malaysia

As we celebrate 59 years of nationhood, I am reminded of the latest achievement we had 2 weeks ago in KL, where commitment to target IoT as a new national economic source was reiterated by the Minister of Technology, Science and Innovation himself.

Malaysia is one of only nine countries in the world to have developed a working roadmap on IoT.

We’re currently in the midst of implementing the National IoT Strategic Roadmap, in which interoperability has been identified to spur IoT in the country, and the market potential is set to generate a GNI of RM9.5 billion by 2020 and achieve RM42.5 billion by 2025.

Within one year, several IoT-based projects have been piloted and launched in Malaysia, including the following areas:

  • For Safety – IoT has been employed in Smart Lock-Up to monitor safety in the police lock-up (implemented by the Royal Malaysian Police.
  • For Community – A community social innovation platform called I-Comm has been deployed to develop applications like flood monitoring. Its scope will be expanded to cover tourism application as well.
  • For Agriculture – IoT plays a key role to assist the export of premium durian to China and other premium product.
  • For Transportation – Taxi booking applications have been enabled, e.g. iTeksi, GrabCar.

At the 10th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform two weeks ago,  YB Datuk Seri Panglima Madius Tangau, Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation mentioned that following the maturing of IoT technologies in the country, they hope to expand local services to ASEAN markets and ultimately introduce top 5 Malaysian companies to the international stage.

In developing the industry ecosystem, we need all players to work together and demonstrate the value of these solutions in order to convince the end users and investors to adopt IoT technologies.

Over the two days conference, conversations with speakers, public sectors, companies from both solution providers and local end users, etc. led me to the 4 focus markets that have been identified for Malaysia:

  • Transportation – to improve efficiency and service level of transport operations. Companies like Prasarana Malaysia will gladly welcome solutions that can help improve public transportation and passenger info.
  • Manufacturing – to enhance supply chain efficiency and reduce the gap between SMEs and MNCs. With manufacturing taking up 30% of the whole IoT market potential in Malaysia, we’re seeing increasing number of services from ERPs, supply chain integration,  Digital/Connected Factories to Industrial Automation and IIoT, etc.
  • Healthcare – to improve healthcare service delivery. Strongly encouraged by the government, solutions like predictive health analytics for hospitals and doctors to deliver better patient care; modernising healthcare with Artificial Intelligence, etc. are currently driven by local startups like AIME, Vital Synapse.
  • Agriculture – to boost income of the B40 community by enhancing sectorial productivity while preserving national food security. This is particularly seen to be a strategic segment.

 (follow my interviews here)

With collaboration efforts between vendors and across industries being supervised by the government, it is without a doubt that IoT would play a big part in achieving our next stage of nation’s growth.

I am happy to facilitate further IoT initiatives and relationships in and across countries, and support MOSTI’s goal to help Malaysian companies expand into the whole of ASEAN region. 

Feel free to drop me a note if you’re interested in the ASEAN IoT markets.

IoT Malaysia

August had been a very busy month for us, but we’re happy to witness the growth of Indonesian and Malaysian enterprise IoT markets since we launched Asia IoT Business Platform 3 years back.

The 9th and 10th editions of Asia IoT Business Platform were held on the third week of August 2016 in Jakarta and Kuala Lumpur.

Continuous discussions to boost the economic growth of both countries via IoT were seen; while new collaborative efforts were formed between relevant parties to drive IoT adoption among public sectors and enterprises.

What’s new on both markets?

IoT Indonesia

With telecommunications as a big portion of the national ICT industry, the government is taking a step further to tackle issues deemed important, namely Availability, Connectivity, Reliability and Capacity.

  • Availability and Connectivity – Development of national infrastructure backbone to ensure that the whole of Indonesia can access the Internet. The government has set a target for all cities (514 provinces) to be connected with fibre optic infrastructure via the Palapa Ring Program.
  • Reliability and Capacity – Distribution channel to cities as the last mile to end users. This include encouraging ICT facilities, data centers, hardware/software platforms and applications that are closely related to human resource capacity.

At the 9th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform, the Ministry of Communications and Informatics emphasized on Indonesia ‘s commitment to be the Digital Energy of Asia. Various initiatives have taken place, including rolling out of the e-Commerce Roadmap to support the digital economy ecosystem.

“The success of the Asia IoT Business Platform today makes me proud – it’s a concrete manifestation of the effort to strengthen the interaction between innovative players in the Indonesian ICT field.” – Mariam F. Barata, Directorate General for ICT Applications, Ministry of Communication and Information

IoT Malaysia

Malaysia is in the midst of implementing a National Internet of Things Strategic Roadmap, in which the market potential has been determined to generate a GNI of RM9.5 billion by 2020 and achieve RM42.5 billion by 2025.

Since the launch of the IoT roadmap, several projects have been piloted including Smart Lock-Up implemented by the Royal Malaysian Police to monitor safety; I-Comm, a community social innovation platform was deployed to develop community applications such as flood monitoring.

Four focus market segments which align to the existing government initiatives have been identified as springboard for innovators use to leapfrog widespread adoption of IoT solutions:

  1. Agriculture
  2. Healthcare
  3.  Manufacturing
  4. Transportation

MIMOS, as co-organiser of the 10th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform, graced the event opening by launching Mi-MIST, an Open Innovation Platform for rapid development of IoT applications to accelerate the IoT ecosystem.

“We encourage every party to join hands in seizing the IoT opportunities. To our guests from abroad, Malaysia will share our ideas and inspirations with our friends in the region, and I invite you to do the same. Let us have conversations on how collectively we can capture this enormous opportunity.” – YB Datuk Seri Panglima Madius Tangau, Minister, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation

For event highlights, please refer to our photo albums here.

For questions or post show reports, please leave a comment with your email address and we’ll send it over.

The team is grateful for the support we gained from all partners in the region. We will continue posting video interviews with participants on their insights and local initiativeshere.

As we continue to educate enterprises and drive IoT awareness in Southeast Asia, drop us a comment if you have some stories to share.

Sue Yuin
sueyuin@industry-platform.com