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marina barrage and water resource

https://www.pub.gov.sg/marinabarrage/aboutmarinabarrage

Water is the vital source of life.

71% of the Earth’s surface is covered in Water, however only 2.5% of water on Earth is fresh water and 98.8% of this is found in ice and ground water. This makes fresh water an extremely scarce resource.

According to the United Nations World Water Assessment Program, 70% of fresh water is used for irrigation, while 20% and 10 % is used for industrial purposes and consumption respectively.

Water has become an interesting area of focus recently in Singapore, where the government has recently announced that water prices will be raised by 30% over the next 2 years. This is to reflect the scarcity of water in the country and that citizens should be prudent in conserving water.

The magnitude of the price increase has made consumers and enterprises sit up to take notice of their water consumption patterns. A leak in the water pipes could potentially be extremely expensive affair. In 2015, I was personally affected when a silent leak in my toilet resulted in the water bill going up 100% from the previous month.

In the larger scheme of things, leaky and aging pipes cause significant water loss. It was reported that in England and Wales, about 3.1 trillion litres of water, representing 25% of potable water leaving the nation’s treatment plants never reaches the tap. While in the United states, the American Water Works Association estimates losses of approximately 26.5 trillion litres of water, costing public water utilities USD2.8 billion annually.

Water conservation is important, as it is forecasted that by 2040 the gap between the global demand for freshwater and its supply will hit 50 per cent, intensifying the competition for global water resources in a way that will impact businesses.

IoT & Water

With the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), objects such as Smart meters, toilet bowls and showers, can now be connected to a network in which, data that relates to water use is captured and further analysed. Insights can then be used to improve water conservation efforts.

To combat the problem of leaky pipes mentioned above, global water utilities are utilizing Smart meters and advanced analytics to pinpoint leakages and conduct pre-emptive maintenance on their water networks, thus reducing the amount of water wastage. Other examples which have made use of IoT technologies to conserve water are listed below.

Spain

The city of Barcelona has implemented IoT technologies to remotely sense and control park irrigation and water levels in public fountains. Using sensors to monitor rain and humidity, park workers can determine how much irrigation is needed in each area. A system of electrovalves is then remotely controlled to deliver necessary water across the city. The program, implemented in 68 percent of public parks, helped the city achieve a 25 percent increase in water conservation, for savings of approximately $555,000 per year.

Singapore

A study conducted by the National University of Singapore and the Public Utilities Board, found that installation of smart shower devices showed that a person could save up to 5 litres of water a day. This has been followed through with the installation of smart shower devices in 10,000 new homes in Singapore. The installation of smart devices in homes are as part of a wider water conservation plan and can help consumers in combating the 30% increase in water prices mentioned earlier.

United States

In San Francisco, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, has automated water meters in place for 96% of its water accounts. Hourly water consumption data is transmitted wirelessly to the utilities billing system. The reliable and frequent water usage information allows consumers to monitor use and detect leaks faster than possible with the existing manually-read meters. For example, consumers are alerted by email or phone call, when water use exceeds a specified limit or when a meter indicates continuous running water for 24 hours.

Consumers and Enterprises have an important role to play in water conservation and Technology can be an important facilitator. With the help of smart devices consumers and enterprises are now able to track water usage on a real time basis and can better manage their water costs!

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451 Research published last week that 65% of enterprises were already using IoT for business purposes. The headline grabbed my attention – Could it be that we’ve found the holy grail for accelerating IoT adoption? Where were the respondents from? (North America and Western Europe) Can their success be replicated in Asia?

As it turned out, the answer was much simpler. 451 Research had defined enterprise IoT as using smart devices and sensors to gather data to assist with business operations and deliver new insights. However the device types included:

  • Datacenter IT equipment (51 percent)
  • Camera and surveillance equipment (34 percent)
  • Datacenter facilities equipment (33 percent)
  • Smartphones and other end-user devices (29 percent)

Is this definition too broad for enterprise IoT?

While we know that the advent of IoT will require new datacenter capabilities, should we consider it an “IoT device”? On the flipside, is there merit to considering it from the end user perspective- as long as they are gathering data for useful business outcomes, can it be labelled as IoT?

It came as no surprise though, that the top business outcomes that enterprises were using the data for were:

  • Risk reduction. 66% of the surveyed enterprises focused on risk management. For instance, oil companies are starting to use drones to inspect oil rigs, which can be a dangerous task for humans to perform.
  • Optimize operations. 63% used IoT solutions to increase efficiencies. E.g. manufacturers can use sensors to gather data about machines on their assembly line to predict when they might fail, and fix them prior to experiencing any downtime.
  • Develop new or enhance existing products. 33% used IoT to differentiate their product from the competition. An example would be car companies that are putting cellular data connections into their cars to gather data about them and provide Wi-Fi hotspots for passengers.
  • Enhance customer targeting. 21% leveraged IoT solutions to gain insights on how to build stronger customer relationships. A good example of this would be a retailer that uses in-store beacons to target customers with real-time offers sent to their smartphone based on their location in the store.

These business outcomes are important in any any digital transformation project. Should we then relax definitions of IoT, focusing instead on the use of technology in moving enterprises up the value chain?

It is no doubt that enterprises will be the top adopter of IoT solutions since it will help lower operating costs, increase productivity, allow for expansion into new markets, shorten products time to market among other benefits.

Business Insider projects that enterprise investment in IoT technologies will skyrocket from $215 billion in 2015 to $832 billion in 2020, and new use cases for IoT technologies will further validate this development over the next few years.

How can we help Southeast Asian enterprises get ready to benefit from the business outcomes brought about by IoT? Will having more discussions focusing on the business challenges that can be solved by IoT be useful?

Join us at our series of Asia IoT Business Platform events to find out more about what enterprises need in their IoT journey.

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In recent years telecommunication companies have been facing severe challenges: voice and SMS revenues have been under pressure, costly investments for the deployment of broadband data networks are required and profits are shrinking due to global competition.

As the profitability of the old business model declines, the telecommunication companies (telcos) find value in another area. With the need to connect billions of devices globally, the Internet of Things can provide a new and significant revenue stream. This is reflected in the setting up of IoT/M2M teams in telcos globally. The benefits of this are straight forward, telcos gain the possibility for additional revenue through, new business models, products and a wider range of potential customers.

One example of a telco that is highly involved in IoT is Verizon, which 2015 made almost half a billion US$ in revenue from the Internet of things. The reason for Verizon’s success is, that the company does not merely offer cellular connections but is instead building tools for companies. Its executives are convinced that in a future where cars, factories, and home appliances are connected to the Internet, success will come from selling applications. This is also reflected in Verizon’s revenue as stated by its SVP, which derives by 80% of its applications, 15% from the platform and only 5% from connectivity.

But Verizon is not the only telco offering applications, the flow away from connectivity towards solution provider can be observed also in other telcos, Vodafone for example at acquired Cobra, in order to become a full service provider to the automotive industry.

As it always is the case with new technologies, there are challenges and IoT is no exception to this. The most pressing challenges according to IBM are:

  • The variety in technical standards between and within telcos, regions and countries.
  • Privacy and security, with particular attention to the sectors health care and financial data
  • Consumer trust with 53% concerned about data sharing and 51% concerned with hacking, according to Adweek
  • Network reliability, with increased stress on the networks due to the rising number of things connected to the internet and a more severe impact in case of a network failure

Regardless of these challenges, telcos cannot wait in adopting IoT applications to their portfolio if they want to stay competitive. This can be observed at our IoT events in Southeast Asia, where we work with telcos that are highly active and interested in partnering with IoT solution providers.

If you are interested in more Information on IoT in different industries, please take advantage of our other articles. Another provider of valuable content on the global telecommunications industry is Telecompaper, which offers the possibility of a free subscription which can be found here.[:]

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IoT productivity

Even if the Internet of Things is still a rather remote possibility, in the next couple of years it’s predicted to invade our daily lives like no other technology before. The IoT is expected to change every single aspect of business, ranging from consumer relations to employee productivity. It will impact the economy at large by granting us access to new solutions, such as precise geo-location or remote mobile device management.

Michael Porter, an economist from Harvard, believes that the Internet of Things is the answer to a lag in enterprise innovation. But how will it translate into the daily lives of employees around the globe? Here, I have listed a few ways IoT will make us more productive by helping to save time on more activities than ever.

But first, what exactly is the IoT?

The Internet of Things (IoT) is basically a network of smart, connected objects. Still, many people find the idea hard to understand – and that’s perhaps because the name itself conveys very little meaning. The internet stands for the mechanism for communication – in this context, we’re talking about objects transmitting information.

Things are nothing else than objects which can connect to the web. They’re able to generate and send lots of valuable data to help companies assess anything from customer preferences to servicing requirements of objects. In the Internet of Things, it will be things, not people, to generate a constant stream of data, which will be then sent to a server and analyzed by appropriate tools with specific goals in mind.

1.More data than ever

If every object that surrounds us will be able to generate data, you can only imagine how much data will be floating in the air every second. It’s clear that enterprises will need to develop new strategies to deal with this surge of information. That’s why it’s likely that they’ll enforce new industry standards to help managers and employees to adjust to new forms of data intelligence. The daily reality of data analysts and architects will change radically.

Regular employees will possess much wider knowledge about data analysis tools – with so much data, every level of an enterprise will require new devices to help them make sense of the information, be it for the purpose of analyzing consumer relations or workforce trends.

This also means that supervisors will be able to monitor and analyze web habits of their teams. Seeing the way in which employees use technologies and smart objects will help managers to understand and modify work environments to be even more efficient and help employees improve their productivity.

With constant access to heaps of data, companies will be able to tailor their products to perfectly match consumer needs and trends, as well as the internal life-cycle of the product.

2.Daily commute revolutionized

With remote work on the rise, many employers realize that commuting involves a great loss of resources. On the employee level, commuting seriously hurts productivity – morning traffic jams or being squeezed like a sardine on the train does get on our nerves.

IoT is predicted to help us in daily commute through an intricate system of mobile devices, cars and road systems which will all be connected to each other and help professionals reduce travel time. Every single element of the street will be integrated into a whole. Sensors in stoplights will analyze traffic patterns and adjust their operation to minimize traffic jams. This will mean that getting to work will be faster and running errands more efficient than ever.

Car companies are already deploying such solutions, and you’ll see them grow to popularity within the next few years. AT&T joined manufacturers like GM and BMW in revolutionizing the connectivity of cars. Driving to work, the employee of the near future will have access to information ranging from real-time diagnostics to traffic information.

3. Improved time management

IoT will also help us to get the most from our time by educating our mobile devices and offering us the possibility of controlling various things in our lives in remote. Devices will learn what works for employees and help them save time – for instance, dedicated geo-location systems which will help us in daily commute or reaching a place we’ve never been to.

Our smartphones will constantly interact with the surroundings. And those, enriched with invisible sensors, will provide our mobile devices with heaps of valuable information and automize processes to avoid losing time on manual access.

Imagine the following situation. You’re rushing in the morning and you still need your daily dose of caffeine. You walk past the door of the cafe and the barista is instantly alerted about your order history and most common orders. All you’ll need to do is confirm the order and quickly pay for it with your smartphone. As you can imagine, this will limit the hustle of the morning rush, helping you to be more focused once you reach your desk.

4.Remote mobile device management (MDM)

This is an IoT powered technology expected to bring lots of benefits to IT departments. In the near future, IT managers will not only be able to remotely control desktop and mobile devices, but also other connected objects. Remote-access technologies will help executives to gain control over smartphones and tablets, and manage them in remote – including devices like Android cameras and set-top boxes.

If they need to pass key information to other team members, managers won’t need to wait until the device users read the message and respond to it. But remote MDM will also help employees – especially in collaboration, where their devices will communicate automatically, helping workers to establish stronger collaboration practices. Platforms for remote control of IoT devices will revolutionize every aspect of a digital workplace.

5.Geo-location data at our fingertips

Since the IoT is practically based on location functionalities, you can only imagine in what ways it will make office life much more productive. To put it simply, location tracking will be a piece of cake with IoT technologies – smart objects and devices will all be geo-tagged, saving employees lots of time on locating them. Enterprises will, on the other hand, save lots of money by reducing the loss rate.

With IoT geo-location functionalities, enterprises will be able to track their inventory, locate and deploy field service staff and realize orders in record time. Every single vehicle, tool or manufacturing center will be connected to one information system, reporting on their location and making the lives of employees much easier.

What does the future hold for IoT?

A significant factor in slowing down the commercialization of IoT technologies is the problem of security. Not only is the risk higher, but protection is relatively lower – devices which could be attacked have little processing power and no anti-virus software to protect themselves from hackers. It’s one thing to hack into an intelligent fridge, but quite another when it comes to a self-driving car.

Some companies have already adopted to the new ways, others are on their way. DHL launched its Asia Pacific Innovation Center (APIC) in Singapore last September to “offer a visionary view of the logistics world, and develop innovative solutions to meet evolving supply chain needs.” Ms. Pang, VP & Head of Innovation, Asia Pacific DHL will be sharing her insights on how DHL is using technology to differentiate themselves at our 7th IoT edition in Philippines.

 

Written by: Talha Fazal[:]

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Last Tuesday, two coordinated explosions in Brussels left at least 34 people dead and over 200 injured. The fact that the attackers were able to hit high-profile targets in the country’s capital – which happens to also host the European Union’s top institutions – serves as a reminder that keeping cities safe is critical.

Cities and urban centers are hothouses for economic growth, innovation and cultural development. In Asia itself, most cities are developing rapidly, and safety plays a major part in attracting and securing investments, businesses, and skilled labor necessary for economic growth and development.

Unfortunately, their very success attracts wrongdoers, from petty crime to lethal terrorist attacks. As cities continue to grow in number, size, and complexity, their infrastructure and services come under increasing stress. Civic resources are under pressure and crime is harder than ever to police.

As it stands, most video surveillance technology is inefficient. Police investigations are often hampered by blind spots in video networks and low-quality imagery. Issues with data storage and retrieval mean incident data can be slow to reach command staff, and data loss can derail investigations altogether.

Recently we saw many ICT solution providers focusing on ‘smart city’ solutions, which make use of a web of inter-connected devices, software and cloud storage systems – namely IoT – to enable public and private services to work together more efficiently.

Are smart cities safe cities as well?  In concept, I believe this same network of connected devices are also new tools for governments to improve public services such as crime-fighting. It can help law enforcement monitor public areas, analyze patterns, and track incidents and suspects, enabling quicker response. By combining information from video surveillance cameras, social media, citizen reports, and other sensors, the solution provides a richer view of urban safety.

Through my interviews with public sectors attending the Asia IoT Business Platform, governments are taking public safety very seriously.

To protect cities against crime, terrorism, and civil unrest, they are on the lookout for new technology that involves:

  • Location monitoring – View live feeds of any surveillance camera to assess conditions; collect data on crime type and location; and monitor social media for possible threats.
  • Incident detection and management – Use video feeds and analytics to verify and detect threats and incidents; alert operators to potential incidents; create incident records; and collect all data regarding the incident lifecycles.
  • Administration and communications network – Easily configure and manage sensors, video infrastructure, and policy; deploy sensors in designated areas, set up regional and central intelligent command and control centers.
  • Analytics – Report distribution of crime by frequency, location, etc., to aid in planning and to help predict crime patterns; identify areas with recurring issues.

We hope to urgently drive the message that public safety should not be taken for granted.  Collaboration between all stakeholders are required to ensure that prevention measures are taken strictly to minimise further attacks on innocent cities. Please drop me a note if you think you have the right solution to enable safer cities – lets make the world a better place with the use of right technology.

My heart goes out to the victims of this terrible tragedy.

Sue Yuin
sueyuin@industry-platform.com[:]

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In our day and age technical advances are occurring in increasing frequency, making it harder for customers to understand which product or service or which combination of products and services can offer value to their business.

In this complex jungle of innovative applications, companies that specialize in bringing together component subsystems into a whole and ensuring that those subsystems function together are desperately needed. In the information technology (IT) field this role traditionally has been filled by System Integrators (SIs). The rising prominence of Internet of Things (IoT) applications in most industries, creates another sector that is in dire need of system integration. Especially challenges with interoperability, end-to-end performance and security need to be addressed.

IoT benefits of and for SIs

According to cms wire, SIs are at the ideal position to act as bridges, linking vendors and clients. As the worldwide IoT market is forecast to grow from $1.3 trillion in 2013 to $3.04 trillion in 2020 these bridges are needed more than ever and offering tremendous value for companies providing theses connections.

System integrator will benefit customers and vendors mutually, states Forbes Magazine. Customers in need of an IoT solution will be educated on how to find, integrate or combine solutions that cater best to their needs. For vendors on the other hand system integrator can help in accelerating adoption and usage of their product in segments which all have their own specific needs and problems. SIs are highly engaged with the end users and are built for stitching together solutions from multiple vendors to solve operational technology (OT) problems.

It therefore seems, that hardware and software vendors with the most robust SI channel will be the fastest to market and the quickest to create revenues. This puts SIs into the unique opportunity to be sought after by both solution providers and users, offering them great market potential. According to IDC Analysts an average of 40% of any IIoT system’s cost will be related to services (consulting, design, application development, integration, deployment, maintenance, etc.), constituting in an opportunity of 40% of a multi-trillion dollar market.

Asia IoT market

One market where the IoT potential is rising significantly is the Asian market. According to Business Korea large, SIs have been focused on internal stability in their domestic country, but now start to tap into global markets, being active mainly in Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and China. Especially in China you can find large SIs like Samsungs SDS, with its expertise in distribution and manufacturing or SK Holdings C&C and POSCO ICT who both have decided to accelerate the smart factory business in China by using IoT and Big Data.

ASEAN IoT market

Our Area of expertise is in the countries Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia. The 2015 Frost & Sullivan report expects IoT spending within those countries to rise by 1648% until 2020. With such an increase in spending SIs will be vital, but in our experience have not been particularly active yet.

Subin Bhatia, Chief Executive Officer of Suvitech, with its HQ located in Thailand, sees the full potential of IoT for SIs in the ASEAN region to develop within the coming 2- 3 years. He states that the ASEAN region is more of a follower with use cases coming mostly out of japan and South Korea. This is due to the fact that infrastructure and legislation in the ASEAN regions (with exception of Singapore) is not as advanced jet. Which is the cause for slower adoption and regulation. According to Mr. Bhatia these markets are nonetheless very interesting, as the ROI in these countries is higher than in further advanced nations. The only thing missing is a wider government support and company as well as government education about IoT possibilities for their country and company.

In our Asia IoT Business Platform conferences both the government and local companies looking for IoT solutions, have over the years shown increased interest in educating themselves about Iot products and services, leading to more attending government branches as well as decision makers of companies investigating IoT solutions in the verticals of healthcare, smart city, manufacturing, logistics & transport, banking & finance, automobile, cloud and data security. We expect a rise of participation of about 20% in these years events.

With the high potential and increasing interest in IoT it is time for system integrator to take an active stake in developing the IoT market in the ASEAN region. We would love to welcome you to our 2016 IoT stakeholder gathering in the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia. Where you and your company can connect and educate the government and local companies about IoT possibilities and contribute your share to the development of the ASEAN IoT environment.

For more information please contact us under Jazon@industry-platform.com or +65 6733 1107

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[:en]Throughout the 6 editions of Asia IoT Business Platform in emerging Southeast Asian countries, we observed differing levels of engagement from the governments and local stakeholders in pushing out smart nation and smart city initiatives.

In Part 1, we looked at how Thailand and the Philippines are investing heavily in smart city projects.

Governments (some call it city governments to be exact) are exploring new ways to deliver services and we see most of them forming teams mainly in the following 2 units:

  • teams using sensors, data and cameras to improve operations
  • teams using digital tools to create new services and apps for citizens

Lets take a closer look at the smart city teams in Indonesia and Malaysia – the countries that have generated most interest within the IoT community today.

Indonesia

We believe Indonesia boasts the most opportunities and success in general, seeing the huge growth of smart city units with new operations centres being launched seemingly every week.

The most recent smart city initiatives include planning of the following:

  • Jakarta Smart City Lounge – the headquarters for all smart city activities, with command centre that will become the coordinate hub for all emergency responses across the city. Instead of building its own apps. It is now working with startups to provide digital services. One of the startups, Qlue (maker of complaint apps) will be showcasing their solutions in the 9th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform: IoT Indonesia.
  • Makassar Mayor’s War Room – brings together data from health, sanitation, transport and emergency services. The city’s Mayor was awarded the 2015 IoT Leader by Telkomsel and Jasper in the 5th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform to applaud Makassar’s initiative of using data to improve public services. (One of its first initiatives will be a new plan to get public transport data. The government will pilot smart minivans with GPS trackers that can report location back to the command centre. The Mayor wants to reduce traffic congestion by persuading more people to use public transport.)
  • Banda Aceh Smart City Centre and Bandung Command Centre – formed to respond to citizens’ complaints on public services by having them report their feedback directly to the unit via an app. The command centre will monitor data from across agencies, including transport, health, education and social welfare.

These cities are on the lookout for smart and data solutions to help in these projects, with government and telcos such as Telkomsel, Indosat, XL Axiata, etc. actively exploring partnerships with vendors from within and out of Indonesia.

Malaysia

Malaysia had emerged strong as a leading digital economy among developing countries, ranking 4th for the Online Service Index in the United Nations E-Government Survey 2015.

Under the 11th Malaysia Plan, Malaysia aimed to move to the top 15 in the Online Service sub-index of the United Nations’ e-Government Development Index and top 10 in the Government Efficiency sub-index of the World Competitiveness Yearbook.

The Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MOSTI) was mandated by the government to develop the National IoT Strategic Roadmap to drive IoT as a new source of growth in catalysing Malaysia’s Digital Economy.

As part of the initiatives in driving the Smart Nation vision, the Malaysian Administrative Modernisation and Management Planning Unit (MAMPU) was established to improve digital services across the government. One of the current key projects is to build a single government portal that will give access to information and services from across local and federal agencies. There are also plans for a new digital unit to work on this portal.

To achieve these targets and transform public service productivity, the government would introduce several transformative changes focusing on 5 major areas: enhancing service delivery with citizens at the centre; rationalising public sector institutions for greater productivity and performance; strengthening talent management for the public service of the future; enhancing project management for better and faster outcome; and, capitalising on local authorities for quality services at the local level.

In the IoT leaders panel of the previous Asia IoT Business Platform: IoT Malaysia, communication service providers such as Telkom Malaysia, Digi and Maxis were being urged to grow their presence in the IoT sector to catalyse Malaysia’s vision of being a Smart Digital Nation. We are expecting to see new level of engagement among telcos this year.

Moving forward: the “Smart Southeast Asia”

Over the past couple of years in the region, the word “partnership” have always popped up when it comes to developing and making smart cities happen.

The reality is that governments and telcos can’t do it all themselves: While governments devise the overarching roadmap, telcos provide the backbone of connectivity and data transport technology that underpin Smart City developments, external partnership with solution providers from all areas is almost a must in developing Smart Cities.

While designing the conference agenda for the benefit of local public sectors and end users, we are always on the look out for solutions that could be brought in and implemented, and case studies to educate enterprises on how IoT has impacted various sectors and will drive improvement and growth.

We are excited and looking forward to being part of the movement towards a more collaborative ecosystem to drive smart nations in the region.

Drop us a quick note if you have an IoT/Smart City story to share.

Sue Yuin
sueyuin@industry-platform.com[:]

[:en]A city with which you can interact – a living city with which you can set up a reciprocal relationship and which can cater to your needs. Throughout the world such cities are being built right from Masdar in Abu Dhabi to Davao in Philippines. It is predicted that by 2050, about 75% of the world’s population will live in cities. This will put a huge strain on the already stretched resources of the city such as its transport system and emergency networks. To handle the huge influx of people our urban planners need to come up with new and innovative ways to increase the efficiency of existing resources while at the same time reducing costs and improving the overall quality of life of its citizens.

It would be such a great thing if our cities could interact with us and give us live status updates about water, power, sanitation, parking and emergency services. The information they would provide us would be so instrumental in improving our lives. This can be made possible by IOT which with its network of sensors, wireless networks and web and mobile-based applications can turn the concept of smart cities into a reality. IOT will help cities track their assets and behaviors, improve on their processes and controls which will enable them to deliver better service to their citizens. The huge amount of data generated by IOT will help city planners make informed decisions while at the same time reducing costs and improving economies of scales. In addition to identifying trouble spots IOT will also help provide solutions for the maintenance of these assets. By seeing to it that scarce resource are allocated properly and operate in an effective manner IOT can help in the creation of an extremely efficient city.

A smart city signifies an urban region which is extremely advanced in terms of overall infrastructure and where information and communication technology is the principal driving force. A variety of technological platforms are involved which includes but is definitely not limited to only automated sensor networks and data centers. A smart city in order to be recognized as one should include at least certain of these key aspects such as smart governance, smart technology, smart energy smart healthcare, smart building, smart infrastructure, smart mobility and smart citizen.

Smart Parking – A lot of traffic jam results from people driving around and looking for a parking slot. Under a smart city setup, sensors placed in parking meters will detect free spaces and direct motorists to the nearest available free parking slot. This will not only save a lot of time but also reduce congestion on the roads.

Smart Water – Metering water can help citizens manage and control their own usage of water. In France, Orange has installed about 1.2 million water meters which is helping people manage their water usage through the provision of real time data. Furthermore, consumers can even check their water consumption by an online account.

Smart Trash – Sensors placed in dustbins notifies the central system about the amount of waste contained in the bin. The system then analyzes the data provided to it and forecasts when the bin will be full. Depending on it garbage trucks are sent to the location to empty the bins.

Smart Environment – Sensors placed on bus roofs will measure the air quality and note down the levels of gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide in the air. The buses update this information in real time and residents through the use of a mobile app get an idea of the air quality.

Smart Lampposts – Sensors fitted into lampposts convert an ordinary lamppost into a wi-fi hub. The sensors can detect anything from Co2 emissions to rising noise levels. It would also have the capacity to turn off lights when no one is using the street saving up to 80% of the lighting bill.

Automated Traffic Signal – Traffic signals with sensors inform commuters of traffic jams and traffic accidents. This helps authorities respond faster in an emergency situation.

Self-monitoring in Patients – IOT will enable self-monitoring for patients where sensors detect an emergency situation and contact emergency care thus saving precious lives. Doctors too can remotely keep a tab on their patients informing them when a serious situation arises.

Smart Electricity Distribution – Smart grid systems allow customers to establish control over their electricity consumption leading to huge savings.

At present smart city projects are in a development stage and involve projects that are small scale in nature but with time they are going to improve and include larger scale projects. A time will come when the data infrastructure of our cities will matter as much as the real physical infrastructure and only then can we say that smart cities have truly arrived.

Other Smart city related articles:

Building a Smart & Safe City
Telcos painting Smart City Visions in Southeast Asia
Smart City vision Indonesia 2015 -2045; breakthrough in Automotive
Smart City” pilot projects to be rolled out in Thailand

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Through conversations with IT executives from enterprises in the region since 2014, we saw great interest in cloud, data and the corresponding data analytics that can unlock most potential in businesses.

There have been huge advances in the amount of data we routinely generate and collect in pretty much everything we do, as well as our ability to use technology to analyze and understand it. The intersection of these trends, namely Big Data, is helping businesses in every industry to become more efficient and productive.

According to our interview with Dato Ng Wan Peng, COO of MDeC, Malaysia has rolled out the country’s Big Data framework. “We foresee a bright future ahead in this area. Among benefits we intend to realise for the country include talent development using public open data to produce useful applications, technology development; and creating awareness within the private and private sectors.”

Businesses that have benefited hugely from Cloud and Data include banking, insurance, smart cities, transportation and manufacturing sectors.

We are still seeing a growing number of dedicated teams led by senior management in exploring IoT and data services for their businesses.

Some examples include:

  • Proton, Engineering Solution & IoT 
  • Petronas, Digital Innovation, Strategy & Architecture 
  • CEVA Logistics, GM Operations
  • Provinsi DKI Jakarta, Head of Jakarta Smart City
  • Bank Simpanan Nasional, Transformation Management Department

These companies were part of the 2015 Asia IoT Business Platform series in the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia.

 

Healthcare is an increaseingly interesting sector that we foresee to benefit largely from cloud and data.

This could be seen through the heated discussions in the 6th Asia IoT Business Platform in KL. Dr. Dhesi, founder of AIME said, “There’re so many patients that it’s impossible to diagnose and analyse without data and IoT. By 2030, we’ll be using cloud brains to communicate, store and think – like an external hard disk. Smart and sustainable healthcare needs to be driven by new and disruptive IoT business models.”

As the momentum of IoT moves forward, data will be a key enabler of digital business transformation, driving tremendous value. IoT will mature from being a platform that improves enterprise efficiency and revenue streams into an entire ecosystem that changes the business model to be more digital and service centric through data analytics and algorithms.

 

However, security remains a challenge in business transformation.

Despite the apparent importance of IoT, widespread adoption of the technology is still slow. Our discussions with industry leaders and enterprises led us to attribute this phenomenon to security concerns: more or less everyone agrees that if data is not handled properly, the consequences could be devastating. 

Connected devices are highly susceptible to penetration and infiltration by hackers. Its connected nature severely amplifies any malicious attacks on devices, and data associated with IoT devices can easily be stolen. As a result, businesses, government bodies, and consumers are wary of installing IoT devices in their cities and businesses.

According to BI Intelligence report, top security flaws of IoT devices include insecure software/firmware, insufficient authentication, lack of transport authentication, user identity, and un-encrypted network services.

 

Taking a leap of faith – there’s still a bright side to data and security.

While the IoT is taking flight in the Southeast Asian region, security problems should not be taken lightly, but have to be addressed and faced head-on.

Security needs to be built in as the foundation of IoT systems, with rigorous validity checks, authentication, data verification, and all the data needs to be encrypted. At the application level, software development organizations need to be better at writing code that is stable, resilient and trustworthy, with better code development standards, training, threat analysis and testing.

While local governments are starting to establish security developments e.g Indonesia’s National Cyber Agency (NCA) and Indonesia Security Incident Response Team on Internet Infrastructure (ID-RTII), the notion of addressing security vulnerabilities of the IoT creates opportunity for security solutions to be implemented.

We came across many corporations and enterprises offering security solutions that undoubtedly boost the confidence of enterprises taking a step in IoT adoption. As the educational platform for government and businesses in the region, we are exploring for more and better solutions with case studies that will benefit our end users.

 

Drop us a message if you have relevant projects and solutions regarding cloud, data and security to share.

 

Sue Yuin
sueyuin@industry-platform.com

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[:en]We spent a large part of the year in the cities of Manila, Bangkok, Jakarta & Kuala Lumpur speaking to local enterprises about this (too) broad & (too) overused term: the Internet of Things (IoT). We discovered very quickly that while IoT seems to be very much over/wrongly-used in the English speaking world, there really isn’t a direct local translation in these 4 countries. For local enterprises in these countries, they see IoT as an extension of Enterprise IT, without having a definition/term for it.

In our mid year review (Bringing IoT to a Population of 600 million), we summarized how IoT applications can be applied to these 4 countries, with some projects already being put in motion, while others remain quite far from realization. As we near the end of 2015 (with every Starbucks in the region starting to play Christmas carols and serve Peppermint mocha lattes, ha!), lets look back at the industries in the region where the conversations involving IoT projects are more pertinent.

Manufacturing

This industrial segment was not something we focused on in 2015 but as we worked with local telcos & government agencies to invite enterprises to attend our events, we found the interest from the local manufacturing firms to be overwhelming. We should have known. In this part of the world, countries such as Thailand, Vietnam & Indonesia are increasingly important global players in the space. While granted, these countries are chosen because of low labour costs, locally run vendors & OEMs are very proactive when it comes to technology implementation within their factories (technology implementation is a lot more attractive when you’re experiencing double digit growths vs no/low growth environments). Plus, legacy IT systems/culture are a smaller problem in young, growing firms.

Among others, we had the opportunity to speak to several representatives from one of the world’s largest cigarette manufacturer. The local entity is owned by an international parent but because they produce a slightly different product (close to 90% of locals in Indonesia smoke kretek), they couldn’t implement manufacturing processes wholesale from their parent company. Another cliche with much truism:- Think Global, Act Local.

Manufacturing & Industrial Automation will be a big theme in 2016, especially in Thailand and Indonesia. Macroeconomic conditions (weaker local currencies, young workforces etc.) have also made these locales more attractive to international companies looking to set up manufacturing facilities – and technology, when used properly, can overcome (some) productivity inefficiencies usually associated with emerging countries.

Healthcare

In the more developed countries, the ageing demographics make Healthcare a natural topic of discussion. Remote monitoring/diagnostics is important not only in elderly care, but for archipelagos like Indonesia & Philippines. We found that in this part of the world, implementation of such systems are being driven largely by the government agencies and young startups.

Some notable implementation in the region: In Singapore, applications like Healthcare ATMs have been rolled out and in Philippines, local startup Medifi implemented a pilot earlier this year, with plans of expansion to other Southeast Asian markets soon.There’s always a buzz during the Healthcare segments of Asia IoT Business Platform, simply because it’s something which all of us relate to.

Distribution, Transportation, Logistics & Freight

I am reminded of a conversation I had with the owner of a logistics company in Manila who was a native English speaker but wasn’t familiar with the term “IoT”. But talk about telemetry, control software, sensors which track everything from his vehicle locations to petrol levels – and he’s in his element. His company was growing very quickly and he was in the process of modernizing its systems to:

1. Create efficiencies
2. Gain better control/insights
3. Account for future growth

(If #1 and #2 do not make up the classic definition of IoT, I don’t know what is!)


In countries like Indonesia & Philippines, the Distribution, Transportation, Logistics & Freight segment have employed M2M technology for years. On the other hand, because of the low cost of labour, many companies still use manual methods to achieve the same goals:- instead of sensors, some Indonesian freight companies send “spies” to follow the drivers of their trucks to ensure that they do not siphon off petrol in their vehicles to be resold!

Which types of companies do well in the Enterprise IoT space in Southeast Asia?

It’s a given that IoT will change business landscapes globally over the next 5 years, but it’s interesting to note that because of the uniquely local problems that enterprises face in this part of the world, the companies that are best positioned to take advantage are those with a big local presence.

Telcos: With the need to connect millions of devices, IoT provides a new revenue stream for the local telecommunications companies. This is reflected in the setting up of IoT/M2M teams in most local telcos in the four countries. These firms now run their own revenue targets (aggressive ones!) and we can only see this portion of their business growing over the next few years.

Large Multinational Vendors: This goes without saying. These companies have been deeply entrenched in the local infrastructure – the Microsofts, Intels & Schneiders of the world. They have established relationships with local enterprises and the advent of IoT technology will make them natural partners to enterprises looking to upgrade their systems to fully realise the benefits of IoT.

Local Startups: We have had the pleasure of working with many new companies who understand local problems intimately and are flexible enough to work around the lack of standardization within IoT. They are providing innovative & cost effective solutions to small medium enterprises in these countries. There were a lot of enterprises interested in presentations given by companies like N’osairisVersafleet & Medifi in 2015 – and the best part is, we are seeing projects being implemented.

International Vendors with a presence in Southeast Asia: Over the years, we’ve seen this group of companies increasing as they realise the potential of the market here. In 2015, we’ve had more interest from international firms than we’ve ever had. But we’ve noticed that those who have invested heavily in the region (companies like ThingworxAxiros, Sigfox etc.) by being present locally and building a dedicated team have reaped the largest rewards. There will be an inflexion point in this market and it remains to be seen if the first movers stand to benefit more than latecomers. I believe they will.

There are other developments within the B2B2C space (of course – Southeast Asia has over 600 million consumers!) but that warrants a discussion of its own.

If you’re interested in IoT/M2M developments in Southeast Asia, do drop us a note with your thoughts. We are currently in the planning stages of our 2016 events to be held in Philippines (23 – 24 May 2016), Thailand (26 – 27 May 2016), Indonesia (15 – 16 Aug 2016) & Malaysia (18 – 19 Aug 2016). See you in the region if you do decide to drop by.  [:]

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turkcell

Turkey is blessed with favorable geographical conditions, with 27% of arable land, the 3rd largest in Europe, and high volumes of fresh water resources. This has enabled Turkey to be one of the few countries in the world that is self sufficient in food production. In 2009, agriculture accounted for 29.5% of employment in the country and Turkey is considered to be one of the leading countries in the world in the field of food and agriculture, being the world leader in the production of dried figs, hazelnuts, sultanas/raisins and dried apricots.

Farmers in Turkey rely on transformers to generate electricity on farms and to power irrigation systems that provide water to their crops. In recent times, farmers were experiencing a widespread problem of transfomer theft. The thieves steal parts of the transformer or in some instances, the entire transformer, strip it down and sell it for cash. To replace a transformer, a farmer might take a financial loss of up to 10,000 Euros. However, in most instances, the loss is much greater. In the town of Kahramanmaras Elbistan, 2 transformers used to irrigate the land were stolen. The incident left thousands of acres of land dehydrated , affecting the crops growing in the area. Replacement of the transformers would take days and the dying crops would affect the livelihood of the villagers.

Turkcell, Turkey’s leading telecommunication company embarked on a journey to utilize M2M/IoT technology to solve the problem of transformer theft for Turkish farmers.

Join Metin Nuroglu, Mobile Device Expert at Turkcell as he shares the casestudy of utilising M2M/IoT technology for theft prevention of transformers for Turkish farmers during the 8th edition of the Asia IoT Business Platform which will take place this 26-27 May in Bangkok.

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[:en]HPE solution providers

By now you would have heard of the Internet of Things (IoT)—billions of devices connected and communicating with each other and with businesses—and how it promises dramatic enhancements in efficiency, opportunities for new products and business models, and the potential for greater customer intimacy.

IoT solution providers are at the forefront of this brave new world which Gartner predicts will grow at a 31.7% CAGR from 2013 through 2020. However for IoT to deliver its promise, solution providers have an important role to play in articulating the positive business outcomes that can result from IoT implementation. Just selling technology to the CIO is shortchanging the potential economic value that IoT technologies can create in the long run for both the customer and the solution provider.

The right solution providers are able to “connect the dots” for the enterprise customer and create value by collecting data, validating it, enriching it with analytics, mixing it with other sources, and then exposing it to the applications that enable enterprises to have actionable insights.

Moving beyond “silo” implementations, the solution provider must integrate heterogeneous technologies across multiple environments and ensure the data remain usable and secure.

In Southeast Asia where IoT is still in the early stages of development, a consultative approach in guiding enterprises on how they may apply IoT to their business could greatly accelerate this growth.

According to HPE, 3 objectives that enterprises can look forward to achieving with IoT include:

1. Enable innovative new offerings

IoT technology can turn products into services and sales transactions into subscriptions. For example, HPE Instant Ink service integrates sensors into printer ink cartridges to automatically resupply ink when customers run low.

2. Increase business efficiency

Connected sensors and actuators provide data that can reduce waste and adjust operations to changing conditions. Labor-intensive monitoring and meter reading can be delegated to Internet-connected smart meters. In the energy industry, for example, operators use data from in-pipeline sensors and aerial surveys—integrated with operational databases—to increase the efficiency and safety of employees and the community.

3. Enhance decision making

IoT solutions can provide the data to make data-driven decisions based on what’s really happening. Product developers can design smart, connected products that report exactly which features their users are using and how. Utilization and wear data for assets lets managers determine where they should be deployed for best return and when they should be retired and replaced. Manufacturers can measure process yields and reject rates and make corrections quickly.

While positive business outcomes can drive IoT adoption, it is also important that solution providers keep in mind the following selection criteria as highlighted by Enterprise Strategy Group on their Whitepaper on choosing the right IT platform provider:

a) Ease of use – enterprises should not need to hire data scientists to carry out IoT

b) Reducing system complexity – interoperability between the different technology stacks is important and finally

c) Managing the quantity and quality of data for actionable outcomes – real time analytics for data driven insights.

Are you an enterprise looking to drive business value from IoT implementation? Or perhaps a solution provider looking to share your IoT experience?

Let us know and we look forward to welcoming you at Asia IoT Business Platform.

by: YY Fong[:]

[:en]IoT is nothing fundamentally new as an invention. It has been there for ages in limited avatar. The closest or easiest examples to pick up will be various equipment’s in thermal power plants monitored and controlled through control systems; Centralized traffic control systems changing signal times based on volume of traffic or capturing shots of traffic law violation. Certainly these use cases were circumventing on industrial or large scale set ups with connections limited to LAN or WAN in the past.

The newer version is to pick up to reach Internet and scale from industries to fields to homes to handheld devices, as we all know. While business pragmatic experts feel that as of today IoT = Smart phones (meaning the scalability and realization of IoT ) in reality, now it is time for integrated industrial and social change for tomorrow to make it more scalable and useful. Look at RFID wave which was touted as big wave 8 years ago, it never picked up momentum because of limited industrial drive to commercialize it at an affordable cost, funding on a long term to drive large scale innovation as it takes years to bring changes and social risk or belief of snatching the privacy.

Why IoT, Why Now?
Modern IoT technology offers multiple advantages and capabilities not easily available to remote diagnostic devices of past decades. Wireless TCP/IP communication is available virtually anywhere around the globe at very low cost, and cloud services offer globally distributed storage and computing resources. Essentially, the entire communication infrastructure is owned by third parties that manage access, devices and data security, allowing service organizations to focus on the content rather than on setting up and manage the conduits.
Not only is the cost of setting up and managing the communication dropping, but also the cost of sensors, data acquisition and communication hardware continues to drop, making instrumentation and communication affordable.

Practically every piece of equipment is becoming a smart data-collecting node in an always-connected network. Secure connectivity and data exchange are no longer a challenge; they are a commodity.

Predictive Diagnostics
Predictive diagnostics models, machine learning and other techniques that attempt to extract knowledge from complex machine data and provide proactive service advice are difficult to build and maintain. One of the more interesting and complex challenges stems from the broad variability in the installed equipment, even among similar pieces of equipment. A couple of examples will illustrate this point.

Consider a fleet of trucks rolling off the assembly line and delivered to different operations. Some of these trucks are used for long distance cargo hauling, covering great distances cruising long hours at highway speed. Other trucks make short trips, some in urban areas and frequently in start-stop traffic. Over time, the different traffic conditions, cargo loads and even the operator’s driving patterns cause these trucks to wear differently. Add to those the inconsistent service and maintenance practices that often do not follow the manufacturer’s recommendations, and the trucks are no longer close facsimiles of the original truck that was used as the model for the predictive data analysis.

Building reliable failure prediction models for highly engineered assets has proven difficult. These models require large data sets that are continually updated to reflect that ongoing changes caused by built-in variability, wear and tear, and configuration changes over the life of these machine.
Manufacturing industry is one of the early adopters of IoT. Philippines and Thailand have already invested USD27.60M and USD 28.44M by 2014 in manufacturing. This number is expected to rise to USD144.06M and USD 327.87M respectively by 2020.

At Asia IoT Business Platform, we focus on bringing together the best-in-case examples of enterprise IoT, and localising the IoT discussion for the needs of the country. Manufacturing is one of the key focus areas for Philippines and Thailand. For the original article click here and for more informative articles on Iot visit Talha at Linkedin.[:]

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21.1

 

Happy New Year!

We’re excited: with Internet of Things (IoT) advancements and education being one of the most heavily invested and focused areas in most Southeast Asian countries, we foresee more developments and adoptions of IoT taking off in 2016.

Also read: Observations: Adoption of IoT in Southeast Asia, 2015

We are working with key advisors from governments and public sectors, local telcos, industry associations to formulate the most relevant topics for 2016. At the initial stage of discussions, we have identified the sectors that will benefit most from IoT and incorporated it in Asia IoT 2016 series which will take place in Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Further references:

Lets have a look at the latest updates on the conference agenda.

IIOT and manufacturing

Manufacturing & Industrial Automation will see many opportunities in 2016, with macroeconomic conditions in emerging countries attracting international companies to set up manufacturing facilities.

As the Platinum Sponsor of the 7th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform: IoT Philippines, Globe Telecom will be speaking on transforming business process management in manufacturing from warehousing to shipping to installation.

Case studies on advanced manufacturing and smart factory applications in Korea by Korea Evaluation Institute of Industrial Technology and Germany’s experience with Smart Factory
 by Fraunhofer IAO will also be shared at the 8th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform: IoT Thailand.

Transport & Logistics

In countries like Indonesia & Philippines, the Distribution, Transportation, Logistics & Freight segment have employed M2M technology for years.

Also watch: Telkomsel to push M2M Indonesia 

We are happy to have Pang Mei Yee, VP, Head of Innovation, Solutions Delivery and Service Management – Asia Pacific of DHL to share on how to leverage Big Data in logistics at our conference in May.

Also watch: Scania case study on a connected Indonesia 

Smart City

It is no longer news that governments in Southeast Asia are upping their push to Smart Nation status, going all out to integrate smart technology into everyday devices for both the benefit of society and the economy.

At the coming Asia IoT Business Platform in Bangkok, introduction to Thailand’s first smart grid electricity project to improve the country’s energy management and performance in areas of 0900 power generation, transmission and distribution by Pongsakorn Yuthagovit, Deputy Director System Planning of Provincial Electricity Authority will be an interesting presentation for companies looking to tap into the Thai market.

We are also bringing in Turkcell’s case study on theft prevention of transformers using GPRS based security system for reference.

Also read: Asia IoT – Empowering Smart Cities
Also watch: Valencia Smart City Strategy 

 

Big Data, Cloud, Security

As IoT growth takes place, there will be a need for infrastructure and applications that can leverage cloud architectures and service delivery models. Increased demand for IoT applications will boost demand for cloud computing in Asia, as the use of on-premise systems will be unlikely to provide the same efficiencies that the cloud offers.

With support from partners including Software Park Thailand, the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA), the Association of Thai Software Industry (ATSI), the Association of Thai ICT Industry (ACTI), InfoComm Technology Association of the Philippines (iTAP), Semiconductor and Electronics Industries in the Philippines Foundation (SEIPI), Asia IoT Business Platform is looking to bring in relevant solution providers in this area for the benefits of IT divisions among end users invited.

Healthcare

IoT healthcare was the buzzword in 2015 with increasing attention for data protection and treatment efficiency.

Due to overwhelming response at the 6th edition of Asia IoT Business Platform: IoT Malaysia last November, Dr. Dhesi Baha Raja, Exponential Medicine Physician from Singularity University NASA Ames Research Center, GSP15, Phua Kok Soon, Senior Research Engineer, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and Yau Teng Yan, Chief Medical Officer of Holmusk will be back to speak on artificial intelligence in medicine, importance of tele-health and big data to fight chronic diseases.

 Also watch: Healthcare to benefit from IoT by Dr. Dhesi 

Banking & Finance

 Mobile payments and e-commerce are huge opportunities for Asean countries. Based on our conversations with various IoT statekholders at our 2015 events, mobile payments are expected to offer major opportunities for traditional point of sale players to move into upcoming mobile payment platforms in APAC. 

Speakers confirmed for 2016 include Kerem Abuc, Mobile Financial Services Supervisor from Garanti Bank and Lesley-Ann Vaughan, Project Manager of M-PESA. They will be bringing in discussions on “Driving through mobility: Employing more IT and gadgets to attract and retain customers” and “African case study: Creating a reliable mobile banking platform for developing markets”

Also watch:

Moving forward: Asia IoT 2016

Asia IoT Business Platform strives to be the leading educational platform to raise IoT adoption in the region.

With the potential and ability to streamline and provide larger time and cost savings to a broad spectrum of enterprise tasks, opportunities for IoT adoption in Southeast Asia are proliferating. It is encouraging to see governments, telcos, industry-leading manufacturers, service providers, software and systems developers getting actively involved in making the Asia IoT investments pay off.

What’s your take and predictions for 2016? Any suggestions on where we could potentially focus on?

Feel free to get in touch should you have any comment or feedback on Asia IoT Business Platform 2016 series in Philippines (23-24 May), Thailand (26-27 May), Indonesia (15-16 Aug) and Malaysia (18-19 Aug).

(Request for full agenda here)

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